Why I love Laracasts

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Published November 14, 2016 by Bill Keck.

Why I love Laracasts

I’m doing a quick post on why I love Laracasts. Now I’ve written before about how amazing Laracasts is, and how I think it is well-worth the price of subscription, especially if you are ready to move on from beginner into a more intermediate level. So rather than give a big overview, in this post, I’m going to talk about a particular lesson:

Cleaner Webhook Management

Before I start, let me mention that I’m not going to reproduce the lesson here, that would be a copyright violation and I have no intention of doing that. Laracasts is a paid service. I know it’s tough to let go of educational dollars, but Laracasts consistently delivers high quality videos that improve my programming skills, so I’m a happy subscriber. I think that’s true for most programmers that have tried it, since Laracasts has so many subscribers.

Anyway, the lesson I’m referencing above demonstrates a couple of things that I got excited about. One was using a handle method on a controller to consume different types of request data and use it to a call a conversion method dynamically. Sounds complicated, but it’s not.

What a lot of us fall into is writing if statements or switch statements to handle the different request possibilities. But that gets unwieldy when the number of possibilities from the request scales. So Jeffery Way’s implementation is a nice solution and is super clean and easy to follow.

The other thing I loved in the lesson was his use of a unit test to flush out the method and see if it was translating the request data properly. He also shows us how to filter down the unit test to just a single test or method, so you don’t have to run all your unit tests. That saves a lot of time.

All of this happens in 8 minutes and 51 seconds, so the video just moves along at a rapid pace. I’ve watched it 3 times to make sure I have a rock solid understanding of all the principles that were expressed.

Laracasts places a huge emphasis on clear, maintainable code, which means that even if you are not necessarily needing the implementation at hand, you learn a lot just by watching Jeffery Way’s approach to solving problems. There’s an art form to writing cleaner, more extensible code, so it’s always a pleasure to learn how to improve our code.

One of the things I’ve noticed about the best programmers is that they always strive to improve. If there is a way to increase their programming knowledge and speed, even if it is very incremental, they are all over it. You never know when something small can turn out to be big.

For example, at work we recently did a migration that caused the old domain cookie to become invalid. This threw off a symptom that would keep calling login, because the session was never set properly. The only answer for that is for the user to clear the cookie. Since I worked with implementing Socialite and changing the session domain, I knew what was causing the problem, as soon as I heard about. It seemed like such a trivial thing. But we were able to get the message out to customer service quickly, and they put out a site message as well, so we overcame it quickly. We would have tripped over that, were we not familiar with the issue. It’s a case where the constant learning came into play and helped out.

Learning is not a destination, it’s a journey. Laracasts, for me, has been a critical part of that journey. After 3 years of subscribing, I still find new things to be excited about…

Thanks to everyone who has and is supporting my work, sharing the journey. I don’t have a donate button, but if you would like to contribute, you may do so by buying one of my books, Laravel 5.3 For Beginners. I would really appreciate it. Shares, comments, likes, and book reviews are also greatly appreciated. See you soon.

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